Rain in the Maasai Mara

Above: One of the five famous cheetah band at rest in Masai Mara. Copyright Rupi Mangat

Published: Saturday, Nation newspaper – Saturday 23 June 2018

Rain clouds hurtle down the escarpment to fill the deep valley of the Great Rift. Copyright Rupi Mangat
Rain clouds hurtle down the escarpment to fill the deep valley of the Great Rift. Copyright Rupi Mangat

Rain clouds hurtle down the escarpment to fill the deep valley. Everything gets shrouded in white. We are looking over the famous Great Rift Valley that can be seen from outer space. Filled with volcanic mountains like Longonot that for now is invisible, we have to drive across it to reach our destination – the famously famous Masai Mara – the land of the Big 5, lion country, an eighth wonder of the modern world and more. Continue reading “Rain in the Maasai Mara”

Nightlife at Siana Springs, Maasai Mara

Above: Elephant feeding in the lush swamp in Siana Springs Conservancy
Copyright Rupi Mangat

Published: Saturday Magazine 16 June 2018

 

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Spirit of the Masai Mara blending into the hills. Copyright Rupi Mangat

Nestled in the craggy hills of Ngama from where the springs that give the wildlife haven its name, Siana, the sound of water and the wind add to the drama of the day. I scan the copper-coloured bare cliffs of the hills where the leopard hides. The view of the Masai Mara from up the hills is unbelievable. Continue reading “Nightlife at Siana Springs, Maasai Mara”

A ‘Selfie’ with Wildlife

Above: Cruel taste – a sloth dressed in pink bow with a tourist. Wath the horrendous clip below on how the sloths are captured and put in sacks to be sold in the tourist trade

Published in The East African Nation media December 16, 2017

There’s a right way and the wrong way of doing it…as the recent case of two tourists trampled to death trying to get too close to an elephant … all for a ‘selfie’.

Selfies with wild animals have proliferated over the last two years on social platforms like Instagram, Facebook and Twitter driving the suffering and exploitation for some of the world’s most iconic animals across the world, reads a new report titled Wildlife Selfies launched in Nairobi by the World Animal Protection whose loge reads – Protect animals globally.

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There’s a right way and the wrong way of doing it

Continue reading “A ‘Selfie’ with Wildlife”

Combating illegal Trafficking in Cheetah Cubs

Above picture:Cheetah cubs confiscated from the illegal pet trade in the Somali region of Somaliland. The cub on the bottom had just died due to inadequate care. The other two cubs were eventually transferred to the Born Free Foundation sanctuary in Ethiopia.  © Günther Wirth.

The horrific illegal trade in cheetah cubs and other endangered wildlife fuelling the exotic pet trade

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Wild Cheetah cubs with their mother in the Maasai Mara National Reserve, Kenya Picture copyright Karl-Andreas Wollert.

It was a phone call from a U.S. Marine in November 2005 that put the wheels in motion for Patricia Tricorache, assistant director for strategic communications of the Namibia-based Cheetah Conservation Fund (CCF) to add ‘illegal wildlife trade’ to her title.

“He was calling from Ethiopia about two cheetah cubs that were tied with ropes outside a restaurant in Gode, a remote village in eastern Ethiopia. He was a vet and said that the cubs would die soon; he was considering buying them.

“I begged him not to buy them because it would only encourage more poaching. We frantically began calling everyone we knew in Ethiopia, including the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Ethiopian Wolf Conservation Program and the U.S. Embassy.

Scout and Patch, two 3-month old cubs reported to CCF by a US Marine soldier and confiscated from a restaurant in Gedo, Ethiopia in 2005 by the Ethiopian Environmental Protection Authority. Both cubs died a few months later. © Befekadu Tefera, 2005.
Scout and Patch, two 3-month old cubs reported to CCF by a US Marine soldier and confiscated from a restaurant in Gedo, Ethiopia in 2005 by the Ethiopian Environmental Protection Authority. Both cubs died a few months later. © Befekadu Tefera, 2005.

Continue reading “Combating illegal Trafficking in Cheetah Cubs”

Be Clear about the Cheetah

Dr. Elena V. Chelysheva (PhD) is Project Founder and Principal Investigator of Mara-Meru Cheetah Project

Q and A about why we MUST be clear about Cheetahs

Can you explain briefly why we need to save cheetah

Cheetah as a species survived a genetic bottleneck approximately 12,000 years ago, when only a few thousands individuals were left in the world. Cheetah recovered in numbers, and in the beginning of 20th Century there were around 100,000 animals in Africa and Asia. Growth of human population, its activities and expanding their territories led to the drastically declining of cheetahs in the wild. Today the known cheetah population is only 6,700 (IUCN Red List, 2015) and estimated to be not more than 10,000! Such a rate of declining could lead to the total extinction of the species in the next 50 years. Saving the cheetah for posterity – is protecting its environment by working with local communities, stakeholders and authorities, as well as with international organizations and people.

Continue reading “Be Clear about the Cheetah”